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Can my employer pay for my trustee training?


Two white women sitting side by side using a computer

The good news is yes! Several previous participants have been successful in asking their employers to fund their place.


Several of our Charity Board Leadership Programme participants have been successful in asking their employers to fund their place. This means that employees benefit from training to become a trustee, at no cost to themselves while the programme can help your employer develop your leadership skills.


Putting together a proposal

If your employer doesn't have a funding programme in place, your first step should be to approach your HR department or line manager with a proposal. This should serve as evidence of why sponsoring your place on the Charity Board Leadership Programme would be desirable to them.


It’s worth including some information about trusteeship, and the tangible benefits to employers. Here are some useful talking points:


Trusteeship is open to all people regardless of their level of professional seniority or their role. Training to become a charity trustee is a proven alternative to conventional leadership training and allows employees to develop their talents as a leader by taking an active role in governing a charity.


It is a cost effective strategy that offers learning by doing with measurable results that benefits you, your employer and society at large.


Sharing the benefits

Leading a charity helps equip people with the skills and mindsets needed to tackle today’s leadership issues and translate that into action within their workplace.


Some of the transferable skills and benefits include:

  • Relationship building

  • Agility and adaptability

  • Innovation and creativity

  • Organisational governance

  • Decision-making

  • Conflict management

  • Negotiation

  • Better self-confidence

  • Critical thinking

  • Great well-being

  • Giving back to society


The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, highlighted similar benefits in their Volunteer to Learn report.


What about me personally?

Also in your proposal, indicate how trusteeship will help develop you personally. Consider the following questions:

  • How will you fit the timing and a trustee position around your work?

  • What unique skills, knowledge and experience, learned and lived can you bring to trusteeship?

  • What steps have you taken to prepare for the opportunity? Perhaps you have done some research into the sort of charity you would like to volunteer with.

  • What are your future goals? How do they align with those of your employer? This could include how the experience of being a trustee might prepare you for a leadership role in your employment.

This last bit is particularly important, as it gives you the chance to demonstrate your commitment to your employer. If you can show that you see a future with them, they'll be more likely to sponsor you.


Getting more information

Getting on Board is happy to support you in asking your employer for help. We educate over 1,000 aspiring trustees each year, and partner with employers including Allen & Overy, King’s College London and global investment manager M&G to support their people into trusteeship.


Please feel free to include our email info@gettingonboard.org in the proposal and we can share further benefits with your employer.


Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

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